Most Dangerous Occupations: What That Means for Worker’s Compensation Cases

most dangerous occupations

Although workplace injuries can occur in virtually any industry, some occupations are more dangerous than others. Here are the top six most dangerous industries for workers in the United States according to the Bureau of Labor Statistics’ 2015 report on nonfatal workplace injuries and illnesses. Do you or a loved work in one of them?

  1. Forestry and Logging

For decades, logging and forestry has consistently been reported as one of the top industries in the country for worker fatalities – and in 2015, 132.7 per 100,000 workers were killed due to a work injury. Loggers and forestry workers are particularly vulnerable to fatal workplace injuries due to their work in rough terrain and in rural areas with few medical resources.

  1. Agriculture, Fishing, and Hunting

Closely following the forestry and logging industry is the agricultural industry, including fishing, and hunting. Though the high risk of these professions may be initially surprising, studies show that approximately 100 agriculture workers are seriously injured every day and nearly 400 workers die each year due to an agricultural workplace injury.

  1. Transportation and Warehousing

Transportation and warehousing account for over seven million jobs, and they also account for a large percentage of workplace injuries and fatalities. In 2015, 201,600 transportation and warehousing workers were injured and 799 were killed in work-related accidents. The most dangerous jobs within this industry are couriers with 6.8 injuries per 100 workers, followed by air transportation workers with 5.8 injuries per 100 workers, then by warehousing and storage workers with 4.9 injuries per 100 workers.

  1. Health Care

Health care is another industry with a surprisingly high number of workplace injuries. Every day, healthcare workers deal with hazards such as radioactive material, bloodborne pathogens, waste anesthetic gas, and chemicals such as formaldehyde, ethylene oxide and peracetic acid. Because of these hazards, 4.3 healthcare workers out of 100 were injured in 2015. Caregivers at nursing homes and residential care facilities are even more at risk with 6.8 injuries per 100 workers, closely followed by hospital workers with six injuries per 100 workers.

  1. Manufacturing

Heavy machinery, hazardous substances and high physical demands can make the manufacturing industry an unsafe work environment. In 2015, 466,500 manufacturing workers were injured on the job. Wood product manufacturing workers are injured at the highest rate with 5.9 injuries per 100 workers.

  1. Retail

Though retail jobs do not typically involve hazardous substances or heavy machinery, the retail industry has a surprisingly high rate of workplace injuries and illnesses, with 3.5 injuries per 100 workers in 2015. Most of these injuries are not the result of a sudden accident or mistake, but rather sprains, pain, soreness and carpal tunnel syndrome due to overexertion and repetitive movements.

Do You Need a Worker’s Compensation Accident Lawyer in South Carolina?

If you’ve been injured at work in Rock Hill, Lancaster, or Fort Mill, South Carolina, then call personal injury attorney F. Craig Wilkerson, Jr. today. We fight again the insurance companies to ensure that you receive a fair settlement for your worker’s comp case. Schedule your free case evaluation today or call us at: